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Cockshutt Tractors


By richard - Posted on 17 March 2014

Building on the success established as a leading manufacturer of plows since 1877, Cockshutt Farm Equipment Co. Ltd., Brantford, Ontario, Canada, later manufactured Cockshutt and CO-OP tractors. The first was the Cockshutt 30 in 1946, using a 4-cylinder Buda engine with a 3-7/16 by 4-1/8 inch bore and stroke engine. That tractor was marketed in the U.S. as the CO-OP E3 and Gambles's Farmcrest 30.

Golden Eagle tractors in the U.S. were the same as Cockshutt 40D4 tractors in Canada. These diesels, built from 1955 to 1958, used a Perkins 4-cylinder engine.

Cockshutt Model 35 and Golden Arrow tractors were similar for Canadian and U.S. markets, respectively. Though they shared the same engine, a GO-198 Hercules, other parts were different.

Cockshutt 50 tractors were sold in the U.S. as the CO-OP E5 from 1952-1958. Both diesel and gasoline versions had the same engine: a Buda 6-cylinder L-head with a bore and stroke of 3-3/4 by 4-1/8 inches.

The Cockshutt 540 was manufactured in 1962 with a Continental 4-cylinder engine. During that same year, the 550 came out in gasoliine and diesel, equipped with a Hercules 4-cylinder engine of 3-3/4 by 4-1/2 inch bore and stroke. Early models of the 560 diesel had a Perkins 4-cylinder engine, similar to the Golden Eagle, while later ones used a Perkins 4-270 engine. It was marketed both in Canada and the U.S.

The last Cockshutt tractor built was the 570, from 1958-1960, and as the 570 Super-Diesel for the next two years, until 1962, when White Motor Corp. bought out Cockshutt. (White had previously acquired Oliver.) White Farm Equipment was formed in 1969 through the merger of Cockshutt, Oliver and Minneapolis-Moline. After that, some Oliver tractors had red paint and Cockshutt decals, but they were Olivers. The 570 had a Hercules 6-cylinder with a 3-3/4 by 4-1/2 inch bore and stroke.

 

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